Saturday, 12 October 2013

Discovering the Flora and Fauna of of Western Australia.

                                To enjoy the photos, click on them to increase their size.


"Western Australia is home to 12,000 incredible species of wildflowers, many of which are unique to the State. Visitors come from all over the world to experience the floral extravaganza that occurs between July and November every year.
The wildflower season is one of Western Australia’s natural treasures. For several months of each year wildflower blooms become prolific, carpeting two and a half million square kilometres of terrain across the State.
The season is influenced by rain and sunlight; the size and varying climate of Western Australia ensures that the wildflower season spans several months and regions. The season begins in the north in July and concludes in the southern regions of the State in November."

When planning our Western Australian holiday, I did a lot of research to organise the best route to see them  both south and north of Perth. We were supposedly too early to see them in the south at their peak, but if we went south 1st, then they would be spectacular in the north 2 weeks later.
Nature doesn't follow the text books, so I was excited by her spectacle where ever we travelled. North of Perth there should have been acres of everlasting daisies, so I was a tad disappointed with their showing, until I discovered that this area had been bypassed by rainfall.

I've tried to collate my photos into different groups - each equally stunning to see. 
I was constantly awe inspired by the tiny size and beauty of so many of them. Ground orchids abound, but I only spotted a few.









                                 

Some were just so fragile.
Others were dramatic in their growth.
  


Some were in stark contrast to the rock and sand they grew from.                              

These were the strangest plant I've seen.

Many made an impressive carpet.

The golden wattle is our national flower. Where ever we travelled it's orbs were spectacular in their shimmering gold. I hadn't realised that there were so many varieties - from the sandpaper leaf, to large trees or the tiniest bushes, they just couldn't be missed.

                             



                           

I loved it when the wildflower colours contrasted with the sea blue.
                   

It was not often that we saw vast areas of colour at one time, but it certainly made ones spirits soar when it did occur.
                     


                    


Kings Park spectacular paper daisies


                    Paper daisies in the drought stricken Coalseam ConservationPark                    
                           

So many colours.
                    


                     


                     


                     


                      

Dramatic banksias.
                        

                   

                                         

Heavenly honey scented bottle brushes.

Magnificent flowering gums.
                    


                    


      

This has been a very difficult task of culling with so many I would love to share. For me it was a month of sheer bliss snapping photos and I must add that Frank was very patient. On one or two occasions he surprised me when he asked, "Aren't you taking a photo of this one?" and actually meant it!

The wildlife wasn't as abundant as expected but it is always special to spot a kangaroo with its joey in the pouch. Their were certainly more emus than I've ever seen before and one morning I was stunned that the herd of cattle in a field actually turned out be over 50 kangaroos enjoying the sunrise.


  Don't be confused!

  Just a few of the many I snapped at sunrise at Albany.

  Sunrise Cervantes and the roos blending in, weren't noticed initially.

 What a life for some!


Frank always spotted the reptiles 1st. I don't walk looking at the ground very often. Need to change that with summer here, as I walked right past this thankfully, baby brown.

 Goanna basking in the sun.


Stumped tail lizard crossing our path.


 
Only koala's in WA are in captivity.

Birdsong accompanied us where ever we walked. Spotted several which are local to this area. 
                   
Twenty eighter or Ring Necked Parrot.

  WA is the home of the Black Swan but I see more in my local area than I was able to spot there.


This is the Superior Blue Wren - male and female. It took a lot of patience to get these shots.



I was very excited when I saw this Blue Kingfisher, but alas, I was in  a group and wasn't able to get any closer before it flew away.

 Silver Eyes - apparently also local here, but these were the 1st I've seen.

Pink Galah parrots - seen everywhere in Aus but always a spectacular sight.

This one appears to be sharpening his beak.


New Holland Honey Eater - amazing to watch as it darts from plant to plant. Rarely still.

I'm not a lover of the raucous crow, but he was looking so very important I just had to capture the moment.

Thank you for visiting.
I would love to read your comment.
For my friends who have difficulty leaving a comment, click on google, click on URL but only write your name and then click publish. Then you have  to type some letters in a box. If you don't succeed with them just try again.
            




















3 comments:

  1. Wow - love all the beautiful flowers! And also the photos of the animals that you saw. Looks like a great trip.

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  2. Such a bouquet! What an amazing variety of wildflowers you have during your wildflower season. It is obvious why vacations are arranged around this time of year. Thank you for passing along such cheerfulness!

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  3. Helen, these are just beautiful photos. I love the flower ones in particular.

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